National trends in age-standardized incidence and mortality rates of acute kidney injury in Peru

Noe Israel Atamari Anahui, Percy Herrera Añazco, Maycol Suker Ccorahua-Ríos, Mirian Condori-Huaraka, Yerika Huamanvilca-Yepez, Elard Amaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common disorder that causes high healthcare costs. There are limited epidemiological studies of this disorder in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to describe trends in the age-standardized incidence and mortality rates of AKI in Peru. METHODS: We conducted an ecological study based on a secondary data sources of the basic cause of death from healthcare and death records obtained from establishments of the Ministry of Health of Peru for the period 2005-2016. The age-standardized incidence and mortality rates of AKI were described by region and trend effects were estimated by linear regression models. RESULTS: During the period 2005-2016, 26,633 cases of AKI were reported nationwide. The age-standardized incidence rate of AKI per 100,000 people increased by 15.2%, from 10.5 (period 2005-2010) to 12.1 (period 2011-2016). During the period 2005-2016, 6,812 deaths due to AKI were reported, which represented 0.49% of all deaths reported for that period in Peru. The age-standardized mortality rate of AKI per 100,000 people decreased by 11.1%, from 2.7 (period 2005-2010) to 2.4 (period 2011-2016). The greatest incidence and mortality rates were observed in the age group older than 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: During the study period, incidence of AKI increased and mortality decreased, with heterogeneous variations among regions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-337
Number of pages8
JournalJornal brasileiro de nefrologia : 'orgao oficial de Sociedades Brasileira e Latino-Americana de Nefrologia
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2020

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