Fiebre de origen desconocido en niños: experiencia de 5 años en un hospital pediátrico de Perú

Translated title of the contribution: Fever of unknown origin in children: a 5-year experience in a pediatric hospital in Peru

Silvia Cerdán-Rojas*, Jorge Candela-Herrera*, Kevin Flores-Lovon, Ericson L. Gutiérrez-Ingunza

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of children with fever of unknown origin (FUO) at the National Institute of Child Health in Lima, Peru. Material and methods: Descriptive and retrospective study with 100 patients younger than 17 years of age, hospitalized between 2006 and 2010. FUO was based on the following criteria: fever > 38.3 oC, with an evolution ≥ 3 weeks, without established cause, or febrile patient without diagnosis etiology after three days of hospitalization. Clinical records were reviewed, obtaining personal history and physical examination data, as well as laboratory and imaging findings. Results: Of the total, 49% were under two years of age. An infectious disease was the most frequent cause of FUO (48%), followed by neoplasms (6%), and 2% due to other causes. In 44% no specific diagnosis was reached. Cat scratch disease (8%) was the main infectious etiology, followed by urinary tract infection (7%). Regarding neoplasms, five patients had leukemia and one histiocytosis. Conclusions: In pediatric patients with FUO, infectious aetiology was the most frequent cause, followed by neoplastic disease. There is a high percentage of patients with FUO in whom its etiology cannot be determined.

Translated title of the contributionFever of unknown origin in children: a 5-year experience in a pediatric hospital in Peru
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)179-183
Number of pages5
JournalRevista Mexicana de Pediatria
Volume88
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

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